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We chat stigma with Elloise

Written on March 8, 2019

Stigma is often something that children and young people with a care experience face, and can lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy where low expectations of those in care can result in poor outcomes for those with a care experience. To help end the stigma of being in care, our #SnapthatStigma campaign shines a light on some of the incredible achievements and stories from current and former clubCREATE members. Elloise is one of these incredible former clubCREATE members. From clubCREATE member, to Young Consultant, to staff – Elloise has been a part of CREATE for more than a decade!

 

1. Tell us a bit about yourself – your age and what you are doing at the moment

My Name is Elloise and I am 26 years old. At this moment in my life I am a mum of two beautiful girls, a university student and I also work in the community sector.

 

2. What are your interests?

I love old hip hop music, exploring and food. So any exploration that involves food, I am in!

 

3. Are you involved in any advocacy or any kind of work where you contribute to the community? If so – tell us about these!

I am. I try to get involved in many types of advocacy across Queensland. I really started my journey to advocacy as a young consultant at CREATE Foundation. This is where my strengths in systemic advocacy grew. I have been a member of the Youth Advisory councils for the Queensland Family and Child Commission, involved in a number of forums across a massive range of topics. At this current time, I am a member of the Anti-Cyberbullying Advisory Committee for Primers Cabinet here in Queensland. I love what I do professionally and personally. I do my bit to make sure the voices of all of us are included in the work I do.

 

4. Where do you see yourself in the next five years?

This is a really tough question. Finally finished Uni would be great! I also hope to be continuing my career in the public service sector. I will be happy doing anything as long as I am always growing.

 

5. Do you think there is stigma in the community about children and young people with a care experience? If so, where did you experience stigma (e.g school, work etc) If so, what do you think should be done to address this?

I do think there is stigma in the community about children and young people with a care experience. I think the community sets the expectations of what young people can achieve really low. When I achieved something that I am really proud of, I have heard statements like “that is amazing considering….” Or “you have done really well despite of….” That can be really hard to step outside of. My care experience is a part of my identity but it does not define me. Sometimes this seems like such a big issue that how are you ever supposed to do anything on your own to help fix it, but I think that is a myth. We as young people have to start calling out those statements. Slowly people in the community will start to see that there is no “Typical young person” just as there is no typical fingerprint we are all different.

 

6. What’s your advice to other young people who might be experiencing negative attitudes from others because of their care experience?

We hear about the negatives about being in care all the time, but what we don’t talk about is the amazing things that come from being in care. We are all more resilient than we give ourselves credit for. My advice is to be kind to ourselves and see yourself the same way as you want people to see you and they will start to see it to. Remember you’re not doing any of this alone and talk to someone. You will never just be what people think you are!

 


Do you know a young person in care achieving amazing things?
Help CREATE snap that stigma and share a positive story over social media, just hashtag #snapthatstigma or email create@create.org.au

 

To read about more of our inspiring clubCREATE, click the link below:

read more Snap that Stigma stories